Top IT Security Bloggers

  • Google search results are falling foul of scammers spoofing well-known sites

    Graham Cluley
    Online fraudsters managed to waltz past Google's vetting and successfully plant a rogue ad for the world's most searched for retail store: Amazon.
    Read my latest article on the Hot for Security blog.
  • RSA 2017: SophosLabs report examines Top 10 Android malware

    Sophos - Naked Security
    Android malware is on the rise according to the findings of Sophos Labs. We look at the top 10 malware families for the platform
  • Border guards force US citizen to unlock his NASA-owned work phone

    Sophos - Naked Security
    There's been an outcry at the experience of a NASA engineer detained on arrival in the US - but your rights if this happens to you aren't clear
  • Valentine’s day: what’s your secret technology crush?

    Sophos - Naked Security
    Naked Security writers reveal their secret security and technology crushes - but what's yours?
  • Senators raise concerns over Donald Trump's smartphone security

    Graham Cluley
    Is Donald Trump really using an insecure Android phone?
    If it that was true, it would probably be the most widely-prized device on the internet for hackers - and top of the target list for intelligence agencies around the world.
  • Unix: A Game Changer in the Ransomware Landscape?

    Trend Micro - Security Intelligence
    2016 was the year when ransomware reigned. Bad guys further weaponized extortion into malware, turning enterprises and end users into their cash cows by taking their crown jewels hostage. With 146 families discovered last year compared to 29 in 2015, ransomware’s rapid expansion and development are projected to spur cybercriminals into diversifying and expanding their platforms, capabilities, and techniques in order to accrue more targets.
    Indeed, we’ve already seen them testing new waters by tapping the mobile user base, and more recently developing ransomware for other operating systems (OS) then peddling it underground to affiliates and budding cybercriminals. Linux.Encoder (detected by Trend Micro as ELF_CRYPTOR family) was reportedly the first for Linux systems; it targeted Linux web hosting systems through vulnerabilities in web-based plug-ins or software such as Magento’s. In Mac OS X systems, it was KeRanger (OSX_KERANGER)—found in tampered file-sharing applications and malicious Mach-O files disguised as a Rich Text Format (RTF) documents. Their common denominator? Unix.
    Post from: Trendlabs Security Intelligence Blog - by Trend Micro
    Unix: A Game Changer in the Ransomware Landscape?
  • Unix: A Game Changer in the Ransomware Landscape?

    TrendLabs - Malware Blog
    2016 was the year when ransomware reigned. Bad guys further weaponized extortion into malware, turning enterprises and end users into their cash cows by taking their crown jewels hostage. With 146 families discovered last year compared to 29 in 2015, ransomware’s rapid expansion and development are projected to spur cybercriminals into diversifying and expanding their platforms, capabilities, and techniques in order to accrue more targets.
    Indeed, we’ve already seen them testing new waters by tapping the mobile user base, and more recently developing ransomware for other operating systems (OS) then peddling it underground to affiliates and budding cybercriminals. Linux.Encoder (detected by Trend Micro as ELF_CRYPTOR family) was reportedly the first for Linux systems; it targeted Linux web hosting systems through vulnerabilities in web-based plug-ins or software such as Magento’s. In Mac OS X systems, it was KeRanger (OSX_KERANGER)—found in tampered file-sharing applications and malicious Mach-O files disguised as a Rich Text Format (RTF) documents. Their common denominator? Unix.
    Post from: Trendlabs Security Intelligence Blog - by Trend Micro
    Unix: A Game Changer in the Ransomware Landscape?
  • Smashing Security podcast: Using public Wi-Fi

    Graham Cluley
    Do you trust that Wi-Fi hotspot? What steps can you take to better protect yourself when you connect to the net away from your office or home?
    The Smashing Security podcast team tackle the tricky problem of public Wi-Fi, and have some tips for you. Listen in and tell us what you think.
  • Lazarus mob possibly behind malware attacks against Polish banks

    Graham Cluley
    A hacking gang known as the Lazarus Group might be responsible for malware attacks that have targeted Polish banks and other financial organizations.
    David Bisson reports.

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