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  • 2,000 personal photos, emails, and other info found on used smartphones

    Graham Cluley
    In a recent experiment, researchers found 2,000 personal photos, email messages, and other information stored on used phones they purchased from pawn shops.
    David Bisson reports.
  • I could do with a little favour...

    Graham Cluley
    I'm honoured to have been nominated for the title of "Cybersecurity Educator of the Year" at the Cybersecurity Excellence Awards.
    But here's the problem. I've basically forgotten to tell anybody about it. And voting closes in the next couple of days at the end of February...
  • Breached Credit Union Comes Out of its Shell

    Krebs on Security
    Notifying people and companies about data breaches often can be a frustrating and thankless job. Despite my best efforts, sometimes a breach victim I'm alerting will come away convinced that I am not an investigative journalist but instead a scammer. This happened most recently this week, when I told a California credit union that its online banking site was compromised and apparently had been for nearly two months.
  • FighterPOS Gets Worm Routine

    TrendLabs - Malware Blog
    Last April 2015, we talked about FighterPOS, a point-of-sale (PoS) malware that was used in a one-man cybercriminal operation to steal over 22,000 unique credit card numbers and affected more than 100 PoS terminals in Brazil and other countries. We recently came across new and seemingly improved versions of this malware. Among other things, FighterPOS...
  • FighterPOS Gets Worm Routine

    Trend Micro - Security Intelligence
    Last April 2015, we talked about FighterPOS, a point-of-sale (PoS) malware that was used in a one-man cybercriminal operation to steal over 22,000 unique credit card numbers and affected more than 100 PoS terminals in Brazil and other countries. We recently came across new and seemingly improved versions of this malware. Among other things, FighterPOS...
  • Cybersecurity Industry To-Do List for RSA Conference

    Network World - Networking Nuggets and Security Snippets
    During his keynote at last year’s RSA Security Conference (titled: Escaping Security’s Dark Ages), Amit Yoran, president of RSA, lambasted the industry as failing its customers.  In a related interview with Fortune Magazine, Yoran stated, “Let’s do things differently; let’s think differently; let’s act differently – because what the security industry has been doing has not worked.”
    Now in the 10 months since last year’s industry get-together (note:  RSA 2015 was in April), the overall state of cybersecurity has only continued to devolve.  Large organizations are moving more and more workloads to public and private cloud infrastructure and proceeding further with mobile and IoT applications making it more difficult to monitor and defend sensitive IT and data assets.  Meanwhile, the global cybersecurity skills shortage has gotten even worse.  According to ESG research, 46% of organizations claim that they have a “problematic shortage” of cybersecurity skills, an 18% increase from 2015 (note: I am an ESG analyst).To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here
  • Mystery high severity bugs in OpenSSL to be patched on Tuesday

    Graham Cluley
    A new version of OpenSSL, the open-source software widely used to encrypt internet communications using SSL/TLS, is due to be released this Tuesday 1 March, fixing a number of security defects rated as "high severity."
  • Using Trend Micro Security’s Privacy Scanner – Part 1: Social Network Privacy

    Trend Micro - Cloud Security Blog
    Many users of social networks don’t realize their identity data can be compromised when the privacy settings in their account are too lax. On Facebook, for example, you can determine who can see your stuff (for future posts, things you’re tagged in, and so on); who can contact you (friends, friends of friends, or everyone);...
  • Nissan LEAF cloud security fail leaves drivers exposed

    Sophos - Naked Security
    Guess how strong the "password" is that protects the data that your Nissan LEAF electric car uploads to the cloud...
  • Invisible porn-clicking trojans invade Android's Google Play store

    Graham Cluley
    If malware on your Android phone doesn't steal any of your information, doesn't spy upon your activities, doesn't infect any of your files, and remains invisible... can we still consider it a bad thing? The answer, of course, is yes.
    Read more in my article on the Tripwire State of Security blog.

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