Top IT Security Bloggers

  • Snapchat turns facial recognition technology on its head

    Sophos - Naked Security
    A Snapchat patent suggests facial recognition could enhance privacy instead of eroding it.
  • WhatsApp blocked, back up again after third court-order in Brazil

    Sophos - Naked Security
    End-to-end encryption be damned: a court yet again demanded user messages, and a higher court yet again called the block disproportionate.
  • Facebook is tracking what you do within apps for better targeted advertising

    Sophos - Naked Security
    As the old saying goes: if you're not paying, you're the product.
  • Mobile Payments: Risks Versus Opportunities

    Isaca
    Have you heard the story about the foolish farmer’s new horse? The story goes that one day in early spring, a farmer’s horse dies. The farmer needs a horse to pull his plow, so he goes to market to buy a new horse. There he meets a neighbor who says, “I have a promising yearling [adolescent horse] that will be up for sale in a month or two. Why not wait? The yearling will be much stronger and healthier than some old nag you’d buy here.” The farmer agrees.  A few months go by, and on the way t...
  • US Congress websites recovering after three-day DDoS attack

    Graham Cluley
    Several websites owned and operated by the United States Congress are recovering from a three-day distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack.
    David Bisson reports.
  • Baseball scouting exec gets 46 months for guessing rival team’s password

    Sophos - Naked Security
    Chris Correa, ex-scouting director for the Cardinals, was sentenced for breaching the Astros' internal database and email.
  • Researcher dials for dollars using two-factor authentication phone calls

    Sophos - Naked Security
    Belgian security researcher Arne Swinnen found Google, Microsoft and Facebook vulnerable to a flaw in their 2FA phone verification systems.
  • Russian security firm linked to cybercrime gang

    Graham Cluley
    Brian Krebs has been doing what he does best, following a trail of clues scattered across the internet and joining the dots.
    This week he followed-up on information shared with him by security researcher Ron Guilmette, who uncovered "interesting commonalities" in website registration records, revealing strange links between a Russian security firm called Infocube (also known as Infokube) and the notorious Carbanak cybercrime gang.
    Carbanak, of course, has been blamed for stealing hundreds of millions of dollars, after targeting e-payment systems and installing malware on ATM infrastructure that resulted in theft from cash machines.
    Infokube, meanwhile, claims to work with some of the best known firms in computer security.
    Krebs reached out to Artem Tveritinov, Infokube's apparent CEO, to ask if he had any explanation for the website registration details showing such similarities:

    "Our company never did anything illegal, and conducts all activities according to the laws of Russian Federation," Tveritinov said in an email. "Also, it’s quite stupid to use our own personal data to register domains to be used for crimes, as [we are] specialists in the information security field."
    Krebs reports that as he sent Tveritinov questions by email, the Russian deleted his social media presence:
    "I noticed that the Vkontakte social networking profile that Tveritinov had maintained regularly since April 2012 was being permanently deleted before my eyes. Tveritinov’s profile page and photos actually disappeared from the screen I had up on one monitor as I was in the process of composing an email to him in the other."
    Read the whole fascinating story on Krebs on Security.
  • CrypMIC Ransomware Wants to Follow CryptXXX’s Footsteps

    TrendLabs - Malware Blog
    They say imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. Take the case of CrypMIC—detected by Trend Micro as RANSOM_CRYPMIC—a new ransomware family that mimics CryptXXX in terms of entry point, ransom notes and payment site UIs. CrypMIC’s perpetrators are possibly looking for a quick buck owing to the recent success of CryptXXX.
    Post from: Trendlabs Security Intelligence Blog - by Trend Micro
    CrypMIC Ransomware Wants to Follow CryptXXX’s Footsteps
  • CrypMIC Ransomware Wants to Follow CryptXXX’s Footsteps

    Trend Micro - Security Intelligence
    They say imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. Take the case of CrypMIC—detected by Trend Micro as RANSOM_CRYPMIC—a new ransomware family that mimics CryptXXX in terms of entry point, ransom notes and payment site UIs. CrypMIC’s perpetrators are possibly looking for a quick buck owing to the recent success of CryptXXX.
    Post from: Trendlabs Security Intelligence Blog - by Trend Micro
    CrypMIC Ransomware Wants to Follow CryptXXX’s Footsteps

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