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Krebs on Security
  • UK Man Gets Two Years in Jail for Running ‘Titanium Stresser’ Attack-for-Hire Service

    Krebs on Security
    A 20-year-old man from the United Kingdom was sentenced to two years in prison today after admitting to operating and selling access to "Titanium Stresser," a simple-to-use service that let paying customers launch crippling online attacks against Web sites and individual Internet users.

    Adam Mudd of Herfordshire, U.K. admitted to three counts of computer misuse connected with his creating and operating the attack service, also known as a "stresser" or "booter" tool. Services like Titanium Stresser coordinate so-called "distributed denial-of-service" or DDoS attacks that hurl huge barrages of junk data at a site in a bid to make it crash or become otherwise unreachable to legitimate visitors.
  • The Backstory Behind Carder Kingpin Roman Seleznev’s Record 27 Year Prison Sentence

    Krebs on Security
    Roman Seleznev, a 32-year-old Russian cybercriminal and prolific credit card thief, was sentenced Friday to 27 years in federal prison. That is a record punishment for hacking violations in the United States and by all accounts one designed to send a message to criminal hackers everywhere. But a close review of the case suggests that Seleznev's record sentence was severe in large part because the evidence against him was substantial and yet he declined to cooperate with prosecutors prior to his trial.

    The son of an influential Russian politician, Seleznev made international headlines in 2014 after he was captured while vacationing in The Maldives, a popular vacation spot for Russians and one that many Russian cybercriminals previously considered to be out of reach for western law enforcement agencies. He was whisked away to Guam briefly before being transported to Washington state to stand trial for computer hacking charges.
  • How Cybercrooks Put the Beatdown on My Beats

    Krebs on Security
    Last month Yours Truly got snookered by a too-good-to-be-true online scam in which some dirtball hijacked an Amazon merchant's account and used it to pimp steeply discounted electronics that he never intended to sell. Amazon refunded my money, and the legitimate seller never did figure out how his account was hacked. But such attacks are becoming more prevalent of late as crooks increasingly turn to online crimeware services that make it a cakewalk to cash out stolen passwords.
  • Tracing Spam: Diet Pills from Beltway Bandits

    Krebs on Security
    Reading junk spam messages isn't exactly my idea of a good time, but sometimes fun can be had when you take a moment to check who really sent the email. Here's the simple story of how a recent spam email advertising celebrity "diet pills" was traced back to a Washington, D.C.-area defense contractor that builds tactical communications systems for the U.S. military and intelligence communities.
  • InterContinental Hotel Chain Breach Expands

    Krebs on Security
    In December 2016, KrebsOnSecurity broke the news that fraud experts at various banks were seeing a pattern suggesting a widespread credit card breach across a large number of the 5,000 hotels worldwide owned by InterContinental Hotels Group (IHG). In February, IHG acknowledged a breach but said it appeared to involve only a dozen properties. Now, IHG has released data showing that cash registers at more than 1,000 of its properties were compromised with malicious software designed to siphon customer debit and credit card data.
  • Shoney’s Hit By Apparent Credit Card Breach

    Krebs on Security
    It's Friday, which means it's time for another episode of "Which Restaurant Chain Got Hacked?" Multiple sources in the financial industry say they've traced a pattern of fraud on customer cards indicating that the latest victim may be Shoney's, a 70-year-old restaurant chain that operates primarily in the southern United States.
  • Critical Security Updates from Adobe, Microsoft

    Krebs on Security
    Adobe and Microsoft separately issued updates on Tuesday to fix a slew of security flaws in their products. Adobe patched dozens of holes in its Flash Player, Acrobat and Reader products. Microsoft pushed fixes to address dozens of vulnerabilities in Windows and related software.
  • Fake News at Work in Spam Kingpin’s Arrest?

    Krebs on Security
    Over the past several days, many Western news media outlets have predictably devoured thinly-sourced reporting from a Russian publication that the arrest last week of a Russian spam kingpin in Spain was related to hacking attacks linked to last year’s U.S. election. While there is scant evidence that the spammer's arrest had anything to do with the election, the success of that narrative is a sterling example of how the Kremlin's propaganda machine is adept at manufacturing fake news, undermining public trust in the media, and distracting attention away from the real story.
  • Alleged Spam King Pyotr Levashov Arrested

    Krebs on Security
    Authorities in Spain have arrested a Russian computer programmer thought to be one of the world's most notorious spam kingpins.

    Spanish police arrested Pyotr Levashov under an international warrant executed in the city of Barcelona, according to Reuters. Russian state-run television station RT (formerly Russia Today) reported that Levashov was arrested while vacationing in Spain with his family.

    According to numerous stories here at KrebsOnSecurity, Levashov was better known as "Severa," the hacker moniker used by a pivotal figure in many popular Russian-language cybercrime forums. Severa was the moderator for the spam subsection of multiple online communities, and in this role served as the virtual linchpin connecting virus writers with huge spam networks that Severa allegedly created and sold himself.
  • Gamestop.com Investigating Possible Breach

    Krebs on Security
    Video game giant GameStop Corp. [NSYE: GME] says it is investigating reports that hackers may have siphoned credit card and customer data from its website -- gamestop.com. The company acknowledged the investigation after being contacted by KrebsOnSecurity.

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