The Upload: Your tech news briefing for Tuesday, July 7

Privacy group wants Google to forget more... Programmer escapes vampire squid... Self-driving cars evade human menace

Consumer Watchdog will file a complaint against Google on July 7, 2015, in an attempt to get the search engine giant to offer the right to be forgotten in the U.S.

Consumer Watchdog will file a complaint against Google on July 7, 2015, in an attempt to get the search engine giant to offer the right to be forgotten in the U.S.

Privacy group files FTC complaint to push Google to extend right to be forgotten to US

First they ignore you, then they laugh at you.... After a year of ridiculing a European court's "right to be forgotten" ruling, it seems that some Americans at least are beginning to think it's a good idea. The ruling required search engines to exclude certain pages containing personal information from their search results on request from the people concerned. Now Consumer Watchdog has asked the U.S. Federal Trade Commission to institute a similar right.

Programmer escapes tentacles of vampire squid -- again

New York's State Supreme Court has overturned a verdict that programmer Sergey Aleynikov stole computer code for a high-speed trading system from Goldman Sachs. It's the second time Aleynikov has escaped the clutches of the investment bank once branded "a great vampire squid wrapped around the face of humanity" for its role in the 2008 financial crisis: He had previously been imprisoned for the same action under federal corporate espionage laws, but later released on appeal.

Self-driving cars avoid damage at hands of human menace on roads

If they didn't drive so well, Google's self-driving cars might have fewer accidents. In June, the company reported two accidents involving its vehicles. There were no injuries, just scuffed bumpers, when the cars were rear-ended at stop lights by human drivers. Perhaps the drivers weren't expecting the cars to stop on red?

RideWith is all about the traffic: fewer vehicles, more data

Google subsidiary Waze is starting up a ride-sharing service in Israel to match commuters with similar routes to work. While one goal of RideWith is to reduce rush-hour traffic, the move may not be entirely altruistic, suggests The Next Web: The service will bring Google a wealth of additional information about people's driving habits that it can mine for its other services.

FBI director still wants to weaken encryption

If we allow people to encrypt their financial transactions and other private communications, the terrorists will win: That seems to be the argument from U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation director James Comey, who still wants to weaken encryption so he and his colleagues can open people's electronic mail. Tech firms fear that his testimony to the U.S. Senate Intelligence Committee in a couple of days could prompt the government to interfere with their security processes, the Wall Street Journal reports.

OpenSSL tells users to prepare for a high severity flaw

The developers of the cryptographic library OpenSSL, used to secure all sorts of online communications, have warned that they will be patching a serious flaw later this week. Given the number of websites that have yet to apply patches for the Heartbleed bug in the same code issued last year, Comey and crew may still have a backdoor into our communications for some time to come.

Microsoft rebrands Xbox Music as Groove

As Xbox Music goes offline, the groove goes on: Microsoft has renamed its cross-platform music download and streaming service "Groove" ahead of the launch of Windows 10, The Verge reports. Available on Xbox, Windows, Android and iPhone, the service costs the same as Apple's -- and pretty much everyone else's -- streaming service: $9.99. There is no free option.

Watch now

The BBC reports on some new 'high' tech services: apps that allow medical marijuana users to order up deliveries from their phone. Luckily there are already plenty of food delivery apps if they get the munchies.

One last thing

Civil society groups walked out of discussions with the government last month over regulation of face recognition systems. But what can these systems really do, asks The Atlantic, and is regulation really necessary?

Join the CSO newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags U.S. Federal Trade CommissionU.S. Senate Intelligence CommitteeGoogleMicrosoftsecuritygoldman sachslegalWazeinternetprivacy

More about AppleAtlanticFBIFederal Bureau of InvestigationFederal Trade CommissionFTCGoldmanGoogleMicrosoftWall StreetXbox

Show Comments

Featured Whitepapers

Editor's Recommendations

Solution Centres

Stories by IDG News Service staff

Latest Videos

  • 150x50

    CSO Webinar: The Human Factor - Your people are your biggest security weakness

    ​Speakers: David Lacey, Researcher and former CISO Royal Mail David Turner - Global Risk Management Expert Mark Guntrip - Group Manager, Email Protection, Proofpoint

    Play Video

  • 150x50

    CSO Webinar: Current ransomware defences are failing – but machine learning can drive a more proactive solution

    Speakers • Ty Miller, Director, Threat Intelligence • Mark Gregory, Leader, Network Engineering Research Group, RMIT • Jeff Lanza, Retired FBI Agent (USA) • Andy Solterbeck, VP Asia Pacific, Cylance • David Braue, CSO MC/Moderator What to expect: ​Hear from industry experts on the local and global ransomware threat landscape. Explore a new approach to dealing with ransomware using machine-learning techniques and by thinking about the problem in a fundamentally different way. Apply techniques for gathering insight into ransomware behaviour and find out what elements must go into a truly effective ransomware defence. Get a first-hand look at how ransomware actually works in practice, and how machine-learning techniques can pick up on its activities long before your employees do.

    Play Video

  • 150x50

    CSO Webinar: Get real about metadata to avoid a false sense of security

    Speakers: • Anthony Caruana – CSO MC and moderator • Ian Farquhar, Worldwide Virtual Security Team Lead, Gigamon • John Lindsay, Former CTO, iiNet • Skeeve Stevens, Futurist, Future Sumo • David Vaile - Vice chair of APF, Co-Convenor of the Cyberspace Law And Policy Community, UNSW Law Faculty This webinar covers: - A 101 on metadata - what it is and how to use it - Insight into a typical attack, what happens and what we would find when looking into the metadata - How to collect metadata, use this to detect attacks and get greater insight into how you can use this to protect your organisation - Learn how much raw data and metadata to retain and how long for - Get a reality check on how you're using your metadata and if this is enough to secure your organisation

    Play Video

  • 150x50

    CSO Webinar: How banking trojans work and how you can stop them

    CSO Webinar: How banking trojans work and how you can stop them Featuring: • John Baird, Director of Global Technology Production, Deutsche Bank • Samantha Macleod, GM Cyber Security, ME Bank • Sherrod DeGrippo, Director of Emerging Threats, Proofpoint (USA)

    Play Video

  • 150x50

    IDG Live Webinar:The right collaboration strategy will help your business take flight

    Speakers - Mike Harris, Engineering Services Manager, Jetstar - Christopher Johnson, IT Director APAC, 20th Century Fox - Brent Maxwell, Director of Information Systems, THE ICONIC - IDG MC/Moderator Anthony Caruana

    Play Video

More videos

Blog Posts

Market Place