Smart Cities deliver Innovation & Security

Competition between Cities

Smart city projects are among the most exciting technological initiatives around today and will play a major role in the world’s future growth and security. Modern technology lets us track and monitor many elements in a major urban environment – noise, light, traffic, weather, accidents and incidents, and use this data to improve people’s living and working conditions.

Traffic and parking availability is one area of smart city projects that is leveraging new technology to drive real change. New technology is emerging all the time that lets us manipulate networks more finely, taking advantage of more sensors, more cameras and more real-time data to improve road traffic.

Recent research showed that the average UK motorist spends over 2,500 hours in their lifetime driving around looking for car parking spaces. That’s an enormous 106 days – and in a hectic, built-up city like London, it takes an average of 20 minutes to find a parking space. Other statistics show that up to 30 per cent of city traffic is created by people driving around looking for an available parking space.

With population and vehicle figures always rising, it is hard to see these numbers falling without any kind of intervention. The UN estimates that by 2050 the world’s population will reach 9 billion people, the majority of this growth taking place in cities. This means urban populations will have grown to 6.3 billion by 2050, more than double the 2.8 billion living in cities today. So with all those extra people on the roads, tracking and controlling car and general traffic movements in a more intelligent, detailed way will become vital.

Taming the beast

Technology provides the tools to make managing this ever-increasing traffic a reality. There are three key elements to dealing with this urban traffic as we move forward – identifying the problem, keeping road users informed and deploying smart mechanisms to keep traffic flowing. Addressing these challenges will allow us to approach the issue progressively and practically.

Data monitoring and communicating with end-user mobile device apps is already part of modern urban living. We can receive the latest overground and subway train information direct to our smartphones when commuting, helping make the journey to work less of a hassle. Regarding traffic flow, one of the most interesting developments I have seen more of recently was in a “smart car park”, where sensors detect whether or not a car is parked in a particular spot and communicate that to drivers who have just arrived, telling them where available parking spaces are with visual indicators of red and green lights – again saving time and keeping traffic flowing.

This model would work in a major city too. Smart cities already have technology in place to install a ‘mesh’ over the whole urban environment, with sensors installed to transmit real-time traffic data across the network. Sensors placed on buildings and on kerbsides could determine whether or not there is a car parked in a space and communicate this information to smartphone users – it could even bring Satellite Navigation and mapping technology into the mix to deliver true, real-time parking information to drivers. Drivers could save both time and frustration – forewarned is forearmed.

Powering the cities of the future

Faster mobile networks are at the heart of smart cities and are enabling people to do more on the move. As networks offer more cloud-based services and storage, this in turn leads to richer content and apps being available to end-users, which both informs and is informed by ever-smarter mobile devices. Smarter devices, faster networks and the cloud becoming ubiquitous all combine to power greater consumption of digital content – in short, users want more data all the time and want it now.

The Internet of Things (IoT) will also play a key role in smart and more secure city development. The sheer weight of Big Data generated by the IoT will impact everywhere, particularly on issues such as traffic flow and surveillance monitoring – town planners and security departments will be able to gather the data, analyse it and use it to tailor future policy, projects and emergency first responder capacity.

The changing nature of the City

As smart cities get smarter and safer, we’ll be able to introduce new, joined-up services, based on gathering data through sensors and delivering it to smart devices to make life easier for both citizens and administrations. As well as projects like smart traffic management there are other knock-on benefits to be had – for example, parking space sensors could also be used to detect street temperatures, pollution, road closures and other hazards and inform citizen real time of the emerging issues and allow then to plan appropriately.

Smart and safe cities are very much about making yesterday’s dreams today’s reality. Back in the mid-twentieth century there was much talk of traffic jams and urban congestion being eliminated in the future. Technology has helped change the very nature of a city and encourage investment in smart and safe cities as a result. Cities began life as religious centres which in time became defence centres and subsequently market centres and industrial centres. In the information era and increased security concerns, cities will evolve to become innovation centres with a focus on safety, and as economic competition becomes more about competition between cities rather than just countries, having high levels of innovation, safety and skilled people will be imperative.

City security in the form of environmental, political, terror, crime and cyber risks will be a key differentiator for attracting and nurturing talent. The smarter and safer the city, the higher its innovation levels and the better equipped it will be to compete in the increasing economic competition between cities and the war for jobs between cities.

This article is brought to you by Enex TestLab, content directors for CSO Australia.

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Tags data monitoringdirectors for CSO AustraliainnovationInternet of Things (IoT)securitysmartphonesFaster mobile networksCSOsmart citiesreal-time dataEnex TestLab

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