Apple faces class action lawsuit over mandatory employee bag checks

Apple retail staff claim that they spent thousands of dollars worth of unpaid hours waiting for bag checks

This week, it has emerged that Apple is being faced with a class action lawsuit over its policy that requires retail store staff to have two mandatory bag searches per day.

Amanda Frlekin and Dean Pelle, former "Specialists" from Apple stores in the US, have filed a complaint with the San Francisco federal court about the bag search policy, which they say left them waiting for up to 30 minutes each day for their bags to be checked for stolen goods.

Those minutes are were not added to their wages, and the former employees say it adds up to around $1,500 per year in hours they spent at work unpaid.

The complaint reads: "Apple has engaged and continues to engage in illegal and improper wage practices that have deprived Apple Hourly Employees throughout the United Stated of millions of dollars in wages and overtime compensation. These practices include requiring Apple Hourly Employees to wait in line and undergo two off-the-clock security bag searches and clearance checks when they leave for their meal breaks and after they have clocked out at the end of their shifts."

The lawsuit claims that Apple's bag search policy violates the Fair Labor Standards Act and state laws in New York and California. It seeks an unspecified amount of damages, which could allow Apple Hourly Employees from across the US to receive compensation from Apple.

You can see the full complaint here.

Apple Employee Class Action

[Via Gigaom]

See also:

My iPhone's been stolen! Should I have got insurance?

Apple's full response to labour abuses report

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