Apple confirms it was hacked via Java web plugin too

Watering hole attacks take Apple staff -- no data left Apple.

Apple has admitted its staff were caught by hackers exploiting a recent Java zero day browser plugin flaw used to compromise other companies.

"Apple has identified malware which infected a limited number of Mac systems through a vulnerability in the Java plug-in for browsers. The malware was employed in an attack against Apple and other companies, and was spread through a website for software developers," Apple told CSO.com.au.

"We identified a small number of systems within Apple that were infected and isolated them from our network. There is no evidence that any data left Apple. We are working closely with law enforcement to find the source of the malware.

"Since OS X Lion, Macs have shipped without Java installed, and as an added security measure OS X automatically disables Java if it has been unused for 35 days. To protect Mac users that have installed Java, today we are releasing an updated Java malware removal tool that will check Mac systems and remove this malware if found."

Facebook also said its staff were compromised after visiting a website for developers, suggesting the attackers were using the site as a 'watering hole' to attract victims that match a certain profile.

Apple joins a growing list of major tech US brands that have admitted to being hacked in the last month, including Twitter, the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times.

Although Twitter never confirmed its staff were compromised by the Java browser plugin flaw, its director of information security Bob Lord encouraged Twitter users to disable Java in the browser.

About two weeks after the attack on Twitter, hackers targeted Facebook. The attack exploited a zero-day vulnerability in Java that Oracle has since patched. Facebook said it had no evidence any user data had been compromised.

Apple early this month took the drastic measure of blocking the Java browser plugin for the second time in one month using its Xprotect anti-malware system.

Oracle in early February issued an emergency update for Java SE 7 and SE 6, which closed 50 security flaws, most which affected the Java Runtime Environment in desktop browsers. One of the flaws was being exploited, it noted.

Follow @CSO_Australia and sign up to the CSO Australia newsletter.

Tags Applehacksjava

Comments

Comments are now closed

CSO Corporate Partners
  • f5
  • Webroot
  • Trend Micro
  • NetIQ
rhs_login_lockGet exclusive access to CSO, invitation only events, reports & analysis.
CSO Directory

Business Risk Management Solutions

Create and deliver online assessments to identify business risks and track their mitigation and resolution.

Security Awareness Tip
Security ABC Guides

Warning: Tips for secure mobile holiday shopping

I’m dating myself, but I remember when holiday shopping involved pouring through ads in the Sunday paper, placing actual phone calls from tethered land lines to research product stock and availability, and actually driving places to pick things up. Now, holiday shoppers can do all of that from a smartphone or tablet in a few seconds, but there are some security pitfalls to be aware of.