Ruby on Rails patches more critical vulnerabilities

It's the second time this month that Ruby on Rails has released updated versions for serious software flaws
  • Jeremy Kirk (IDG News Service)
  • — 09 January, 2013 07:24

Those using the Ruby on Rails web application framework on their websites are being advised to update the software immediately after multiple new vulnerabilities were found. It's the second time this month that Rails has been patched because of serious flaws.

Ruby on Rails is an open-source web application development framework that is widely used across the Internet on websites including Hulu, GroupOn and Scribd.

One of the problems, CVE-2013-0156, lies in the parameter parsing code for Ruby on Rails, which would allow attackers to bypass authentication systems, perform SQL injection attacks or a denial of service attack against applications using Rails, according to an advisory on Tuesday. A SQL injection attack involves sending commands through a web-based form to a website's backend database, which, if not protected properly, can return sensitive data.

The second issue, CVE-2013-0155, would allow an attacker to send unexpected database queries with the command "IS NULL" due to the way Active Record interprets parameters in combination with the way that JSON parameters are parsed, according to another writeup.

The writeup advised that this particular vulnerability is a variant of CVE-2012-2660 and CVE-2012-2694. "Even if you upgraded to address those issues, you must take action again," it said.

Four updated versions of Rails were released on Tuesday: 3.2.11, 3.1.10, 3.0.19, and 2.3.15, according to the Rails blog. "These releases contain two extremely critical security fixes so please update immediately," it advised.

It's the second time this month that Rails has been updated due to critical vulnerabilities. Rails versions 3.2.10, 3.1.9, and 3.0.18 were released on Jan. 2 to address CVE-2012-5664, a SQL injection vulnerability.

Rails apologized for releasing that patch so close to the holiday break, but said that "regrettably the exploit has already been publicly disclosed, and we don't feel we can delay the release."

Send news tips and comments to jeremy_kirk@idg.com. Follow me on Twitter: @jeremy_kirk

Tags: security, Desktop security, None, data protection, Exploits / vulnerabilities

Review: File Recovery Tools

READ THIS ARTICLE
DO NOT SHOW THIS BOX AGAIN [ x ]
Comments are now closed.
CSO Corporate Partners
  • Webroot
  • Trend Micro
  • NetIQ
rhs_login_lockGet exclusive access to CSO, invitation only events, reports & analysis.
CSO Directory

Endpoint Security and Data Protection

Protect your computers and data.

Latest Jobs
Security Awareness Tip

Incident handling is a vast topic, but here are a few tips for you to consider in your incident response. I hope you never have to use them, but the odds are at some point you will and I hope being ready saves you pain (or your job!).


  1. Have an incident response plan.

  2. Pre-define your incident response team 

  3. Define your approach: watch and learn or contain and recover.

  4. Pre-distribute call cards.

  5. Forensic and incident response data capture.

  6. Get your users on-side.

  7. Know how to report crimes and engage law enforcement. 

  8. Practice makes perfect.

For the full breakdown on this article

Security ABC Guides

Warning: Tips for secure mobile holiday shopping

I’m dating myself, but I remember when holiday shopping involved pouring through ads in the Sunday paper, placing actual phone calls from tethered land lines to research product stock and availability, and actually driving places to pick things up. Now, holiday shoppers can do all of that from a smartphone or tablet in a few seconds, but there are some security pitfalls to be aware of.