RIM has a BlackBerry 10 OS password blacklist

  • Liam Tung (CSO Online)
  • — 06 December, 2012 20:19

BlackBerry 10 might be very, very late, but when it arrives the OS will contain a small password security feature that reinforces its claim to be the most secure mobile platform.

As the LinkedIn breach showed, password crackers can make light work of weak passwords, even if they're protected, so RIM will do its bit to prevent the worst from entering its new BlackBerry 10 OS.

The 106 word blacklist, discovered by BlackBerry enthusiasts, RapidBerry, contains obviously bad choices like “123456”, “abc123”, “playbook”, “f**kme” and “f**kyou”, but also a host of other less obvious ones, typically derived from North American culture.

For example, the whole cast of “Pooh Bear” is banned -- “tigger”, “eeyore” and “piglet” -- as well as popular sports like “hockey” and “football”.

The forbidden password list is synced with the PasswordService.properties file from the BlackBerry IdM server, according to RapidBerry. 

The password list is different to the worst uncovered from LinkedIn’s breach, but RIM’s 106 fall well short of the 370 Twitter banned in 2010, many of which appear in RIM’s list too.

However, RIM should be able to add to the list over time, according to Berry Review, which noted a similar feature in BlackBerry Enterprise Server has been available for enterprise for some time.

Here’s RIM’s list:

1=123456

2=12345678

3=123abc

4=a1b2c3

5=aaaaaa

6=abc123

7=abc123

8=abcdef

9=amanda

10=andrew

11=angel

12=asdfgh

13=august

14=avalon

15=bandit

16=barney

17=baseball

18=batman

19=biteme

20=brandy

21=buster

22=butthead

23=calvin

24=canada

25=changeme

26=chelsea

27=coffee

28=computer

29=cowboy

30=diamond

31=donald

32=dorothy

33=dragon

34=eeyore

35=falcon

36=fishing

37=football

38=freedom

39=fuckme

40=fuckyou

41=gandalf

42=george

43=harley

44=hello

45=helpme

46=hockey

47=iloveyou

48=internet

49=jennifer

50=jonathan

51=jordan

52=letmein

53=maggie

54=marina

55=master

56=matthew

57=merlin

58=michael

59=michelle

60=mickey

61=mike

62=miller

63=molson

64=Monday

65=monday

66=monkey

67=mustang

68=natasha

69=ncc1701

70=newpass

71=newyork

72=pamela

73=password

74=patrick

75=pepper

76=piglet

77=poohbear

78=pookie

79=princess

80=qwerty

81=rabbit

82=rachel

83=ranger

84=rocket

85=secret

86=service

87=shadow

88=snoopy

89=soccer

90=sparky

91=spring

92=steven

93=success

94=summer

95=sunshine

96=thomas

97=tigger

98=trustno1

99=victoria

100=whatever

101=wizard

102=zapata

103=blackberry

104=blackberryid

105=bbidentity

106=playbook

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Tags: password security, RIM, twitter, blackberry enterprise server, Linkedin breach, RapidBerry, blackberry 10

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