8 ways to become a cloud security expert

Information about how to securely navigate in the public clouds is, well, cloudy

Information about how to securely navigate in the public clouds is, well, cloudy. We asked enterprise IT folks and IT consultants what resources they turned to get educated on this particular topic. The responses can loosely be broken down into three categories: niche conferences; big conferences, and authoritative voices accessible on the Internet.

Niche venues

1. The Cloud Security Alliance (CSA) is hosting CSA Congress 2011 in Orlando on Nov. 16 and 17. The CSA is a vendor-neutral organization that is largely credited with driving best practices in cloud security across the industry.

2. Salesforce.com, one of the more trusted public cloud SaaS applications, holds its annual conference called DreamForce in September.

3. An organization called CloudCamp bills itself as an "unconference" and is a series of regional venues where early adopters of cloud computing technologies gather regionally to exchange ideas. In the fourth quarter of 2011, there are upwards of 15 events planned around the world.

4. SANS, an information security training organization, has established a new line of courses on cloud security that range from the basic "Cloud Security Fundamentals" and "Virtualization and Private Cloud Security" -- both of which are slated to take place in New Orleans in January 2012.

Tips on cloud security

Big security conferences

The major security conferences have all integrated classes relating to the cloud into their session tracks. While many of the 2012 agendas are not yet formed, industry analysts and security practitioners interviewed, say they expect it still to be a hot topic at trade shows.

5. First up in North America is RSA in San Francisco in February. RSA is holding its European conference in London this week and in Beijing in November.

6. Several users said that if you really want to know the state of security in the cloud, you should attend the Black Hat conference, which next will take place in late July in Las Vegas.

On the Web

Among the countless number of blogs out there talking about cloud security, two repeatedly stood out in our informal survey of sources.

7. The first is authored by Ed Haletky, owner of the analyst firm AstroArch Consulting. Haletky's blog appears on the site, TheVirtualizationPractice.com and writes under the pseudonym Texiwill.

8. The second popular blog called Rational Survivability and written by Chris Hoff, who describes himself as a security professional with "20 years of experience in high-profile global roles in network and information security architecture, engineering, operations, product management and marketing with a passion for virtualization and all things Cloud." He's is employed by Juniper Networks, but his opinions are his own.

Tags: security, internet, cloud computing

Fake-police ransomware reaches Australia

READ THIS ARTICLE
DO NOT SHOW THIS BOX AGAIN [ x ]
Comments are now closed.
CSO Corporate Partners
  • Webroot
  • Trend Micro
  • NetIQ
rhs_login_lockGet exclusive access to CSO, invitation only events, reports & analysis.
CSO Directory

Authentication

RSA offers a wide range of strong two-factor authentication solutions to help organizations assure user identities and meet compliance requirements.

Latest Jobs
Security Awareness Tip

Incident handling is a vast topic, but here are a few tips for you to consider in your incident response. I hope you never have to use them, but the odds are at some point you will and I hope being ready saves you pain (or your job!).


  1. Have an incident response plan.

  2. Pre-define your incident response team 

  3. Define your approach: watch and learn or contain and recover.

  4. Pre-distribute call cards.

  5. Forensic and incident response data capture.

  6. Get your users on-side.

  7. Know how to report crimes and engage law enforcement. 

  8. Practice makes perfect.

For the full breakdown on this article

Security ABC Guides

Warning: Tips for secure mobile holiday shopping

I’m dating myself, but I remember when holiday shopping involved pouring through ads in the Sunday paper, placing actual phone calls from tethered land lines to research product stock and availability, and actually driving places to pick things up. Now, holiday shoppers can do all of that from a smartphone or tablet in a few seconds, but there are some security pitfalls to be aware of.